Private studio in Slovakia

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Starlight
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Location: Slovakia, Europe

Re: Private studio in Slovakia

#16

Postby Starlight » Fri, 2020-Jan-10, 10:30

A slow start to the new year. Two HVAC guys installed the extras for the AC.

More ceiling mounts, this time for the two copper pipes and electric cable that will connect the indoor and outdoor units of the AC.
LP0458.jpg

All three were taped together and fed through a hole drilled at ceiling level.
LP0468.jpg

The condensation drain pipe for the AC feeds into where, in the original building, there was a sink. Perfect!
LP0465.jpg

Everything was then taped together and poked through the insulation and now awaits the new OSB and plasterboard of the studio room before they return to install the AC unit.
LP0464.jpg



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Soundman2020
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Re: Private studio in Slovakia

#17

Postby Soundman2020 » Fri, 2020-Jan-10, 11:32

Great! You have HVAC! :thu:

Suggestion: Where the pipe bundle comes through the drywall, try to decouple that as much as you can. Those pipes can transmit mechanical vibration, from both the compressor unit outside and also potentially from the indoor unit, so its a good idea to cut the hole a little larger than it needs to be for just the pipe bundle, then caulk like crazy all around that to get a good seal. Use a high flexibility caulk here, if you can find it. Softer than the normal ones. Here's a brief list of some of those:

- Formex CanSeal NS
- Sascho Mor-Flexx
- Sascho Big Stretch
- Ardex Flex Caulk
- Dow Corning 790
- Dap 18128 Alex Plus Acrylic Latex Caulk Plus Silicone

Those are all high flexibility, with Durometer ratings around 25 to 35 (Shore A)

Also, build that up in layers: don't try to apply one huge blob of caulk all at once. Rather, apply just enough to close up the gap, wait for that to cure (at least partially), then apply a second layer to add more mass and improve the seal, then later a third layer.

Caulk is roughly twice the density of drywall, so you need to make the caulk at least half as thick as your drywall. Thus, if you are using two layers of 16mm drywall (for example) for that leaf, then your total caulk thickness in the hole should be at least 16mm.


- Stuart -



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Soundman2020
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Re: Private studio in Slovakia

#18

Postby Soundman2020 » Fri, 2020-Jan-10, 11:46

Another thing I noticed:

The condensation drain pipe for the AC feeds into where, in the original building, there was a sink. Perfect!
Yep, but you seem to have a "droopy loop" of condensate pipe,sagging down low just before it enters the drain pipe. It would be better to eliminate that loop, as you'll have water accumulating inside that. I imagine you are trying to create an "S" trap or "P" trap like that, but if that is the plan it would be better to just buy a proper trap and attach it right where the drain pipe comes out of the wall, and run the condensate pipe directly into that, with no saggy loops. The condensate drain isn't really meant for that job (storing water to use as a gas seal to the sewer): Those are usually very light-weight hoses, a bit fragile. Not really apt for the job. If you don't need a trap there (if there's another one further down the line), then just run the condensate pipe directly into the drain pipe, and seal it up well. (Caulk is your friend! :) )

- Stuart -



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Starlight
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Location: Slovakia, Europe

Re: Private studio in Slovakia

#19

Postby Starlight » Fri, 2020-Jan-10, 13:51

Thanks, Stuart. It is great to have someone else cast a critical eye over the proceedings.

I get your point regarding the AC pipes entering the studio's inner wall, which will be immediately behind the indoor AC unit. I have some homework to do.

The droopy loop on the condensate pipe was suggested by the AC guys. I cannot see further down the line as it goes through the 14cm wall we built and then disappears into the existing bathroom wall. That makes me think that it needs a trap as there is unlikely to be one further down the line. Buying a proper P trap would be the better thing to do. What a helpful tip!




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