Cloth stretching?

All about acoustics. This is your new home if you already have a studio or other acoustic space, but it isn't working out for you, sounds bad, and you need to fix it...
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ericwisgikl
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Cloth stretching?

#1

Postby ericwisgikl » Sun, 2020-Jun-28, 16:15

Hi folks!

I have some questions for you:

How do you stretch cloth in front of acoustic panels that are already in place and cannot be taken out?

I've been making it in such a way that later I put some wood in front of staples or nails, or wrapping the cloth around panels, if they are not hanged yet, but my question is about big structures and panels already built that end up with cloth in front of them in a neat way.

I know some people achieve great results with "contact glue" (I don't know how is it said in English, I hope you know what kind of glue I mean), but I think it could be such a mess if doing it by first time, and I think there could be more ways.

I also think that a frame could be made for the cloth, and then it could be nailed or such in front of the structure that holds the insulation in place, but I'm not sure how to nail or fix it in place without the nails or screws being seen.

Some time ago I found this system, called Swall clip: https://www.swaldeco.com/fr/boutique/ba ... -108optima

I wonder if is it there any DIY way of doing that, since that system isn't easy to get in my country.


Cheers!

-Eric-



SoWhat
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Cloth stretching?

#2

Postby SoWhat » Sun, 2020-Jun-28, 16:30

Greetings Eric,

So what is covering the large panels that are in place now?

All the best,

Paul



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endorka
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Cloth stretching?

#3

Postby endorka » Sun, 2020-Jun-28, 18:09

I've thought about the cloth & additional frame approach before, and recall someone recommending these be attached with the small headless pins / nails joiners use. No idea what these are called sorry - the skirting boards and door architraves in our house are fitted with these, and they go flush with the wood. Presumably applied with some sort of nail gun. Apparently they only make a tiny hole in the fabric that is invisible or very close to invisible.

Another way might be to stretch & staple the fabric over the existing frames, then cover the stapled edges with some smart edge beading, stripwood or similar.

Cheers,
Jennifer



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ericwisgikl
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Cloth stretching?

#4

Postby ericwisgikl » Sun, 2020-Jun-28, 18:27

Paul, Jennifer, thank you for answering!

SoWhat wrote:Source of the post So what is covering the large panels that are in place now?

I'm designing a studio that isn't build yet (the treatment at least), and I'm searching for options, since I'm in the designing stage.

endorka wrote:Source of the post these be attached with the small headless pins / nails joiners use. No idea what these are called sorry - the skirting boards and door architraves in our house are fitted with these, and they go flush with the wood. Presumably applied with some sort of nail gun. Apparently they only make a tiny hole in the fabric that is invisible or very close to invisible.

It's a good idea Jennifer. Sure, the best by now. I was thinking that too already. But anyway I was wondering how some pro studios get the cloth stretching so neat around big structures without edge beading or similar. I'll attach some example photos.

Cheers!
Eric
Attachments
newtone_control_room_a_03.jpg
LHRS_Holtz_12-10-2015-1.jpg



SoWhat
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Cloth stretching?

#5

Postby SoWhat » Sun, 2020-Jun-28, 20:24

Greeting Eric,

My guess would be that upholstery specialists are sub-contracted for these big pieces. If you look at large, nice furniture, the edges, regardless of their shape (curved, squared) are super neat. I wouldn't doubt that in addition to the tacks/nails Jennifer mentioned, an iron, and possibly a (big) glue gun are used.

All the best,

Paul



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Soundman2020
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Cloth stretching?

#6

Postby Soundman2020 » Tue, 2020-Jun-30, 16:01

recall someone recommending these be attached with the small headless pins / nails joiners use. No idea what these are called sorry
I think you mean "finishing nails" or "brads".

I was thinking that too already. But anyway I was wondering how some pro studios get the cloth stretching so neat around big structures without edge beading or similar. I'll attach some example photos.
I think your photos are not really showing your situation! Those panel were very probably covered with fabric BEFORE being placed in their final location... but in your case, you want to do it AFTER they have already been hung.... Not so easy!

I would suggest that you make a light-weight frame that fits over the devices you want to cover, then wrap the fabric around that, all the way to the back, staple it in place, then put the finished "cover" over the device, held in place with Velcro, magnets, ... or maybe finishing nails!

Part of the secret to getting the fabric to look good, is to lay it over the frame loosely, then work from one side towards the other, stretching it evenly, and working from the center outwards: get the thread of the fabric lined up with the frame nicely, tack that side in place in the middle, then stretch it across gently to the other side. On that "other side", do the same: start from the center and work outwards in both directions at once, going to the corners, then back in again, once again lining up the thread with the frame. Then do the same for the top and bottom: line up the thread with the frame, starting at the center and working out, then corners, then back. Then repeat this process all around the frame, stretching to get the thread lined up, then stapling, in a criss-cross sequence (similar to tightening the lug nuts on your car wheels). I'm not sure where I got this image from, but it shows the stapling sequence quite well:
fabric-stapling-sequence.SML-ROT.jpg


For complex shapes and doing very large areas fast, there are also commercial systems for stretching the fabric into pace neatly, such as this one:
fabric-stretch-commercial-installation-system.jpg
fabric-stretch-commercial-installation-system-2.jpg
A bit more expensive, and it still need care to get the stretch right and keep it straight and neat, but it does go faster, and allows you to do fancy edging and strange shapes more easily. (I'm not endorsing this specific system! I just like the photos, as they clearly show how the system works).


- Stuart -



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ericwisgikl
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Cloth stretching?

#7

Postby ericwisgikl » Tue, 2020-Jun-30, 16:32

Thanks Stuart!

I was thinking, and found that I could stretch cloth over a frame going in front of the acoustic treatment, and then attached in place by finishing nails, being that the neatest way, at least in my situation. And every situation is a different world. There'll be situations where you can handle better in other ways and it would be ok too.

I was wondered about a method I see in some studios here in Argentina, where they use glue to attach the cloth and then stretch it in place, but for sure it is the hardest way, if done by first time. Maybe there are some experienced guys who had made that work over most pro studios here, and are almost the only ones who could make it right.

Other times, I had to figure out some other creative ways. Last year I was hired to make the panels for a recording studio where I used to work as engineer, but I didn't designed, just constructed the acoustic devices as the acoustician told us to do it, and got to screw every panel and covered the screws with another panels, which were wood covered. Then, the upper and downer screws were covered by baseboard. It was such a puzzle to achieve a neat way to attach all neatly, but it ended up just great! I'll show you some pics :D

estudio1.jpg

That mencioned before was done in the sides and rear wall. For the front wall, between and under windows, I used the french cleat method in other panels and it is a very good and neat way of attachment, but it isn't always posible to use. There has to be some room above the panels to fit in place.
3572c965c08d7abef41e5f8defd52c5f.jpg
3572c965c08d7abef41e5f8defd52c5f.jpg (15.75 KiB) Viewed 104 times
3572c965c08d7abef41e5f8defd52c5f.jpg
3572c965c08d7abef41e5f8defd52c5f.jpg (15.75 KiB) Viewed 104 times


I hope you find it useful and get new ways of doing this hard task.

Cheers,
Eric



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Soundman2020
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Cloth stretching?

#8

Postby Soundman2020 » Tue, 2020-Jun-30, 16:49

That's a great image of how French Cleats work! Thanks for posting that.

A good way of doing that with acoustic panels hanging on the wall is to make the cleats such that you can slide the device a bit to the left or right, after it is in place, to allow for some adjustment in position.

- Stuart -




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